Handheld Arduino Pong Console

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Use an OLED screen to play pong in the palm of your hand! Simply plug in a micro USB cable and you're ready to play - with sound effects!

 

Handheld Arduino Pong Console

Things used in this project

 

Hardware components

HARDWARE LIST
1 DFRobot 128x128px OLED
1 DFRobot 3W 8 Ohm Speaker
4 6mm Tactile Switch
1 Arduino Nano
1 SparkFun microB USB Breakout

Software apps and online services

 

Notepad++

 

Arduino IDE

 

Autodesk Fusion 360

 

Hand tools and fabrication machines

 

3D Printer (generic)

 

 

Story

 

Some Background

 

DFRobot reached out to me recently, wanting me to use their special Arduino Nano board and OLED. At first I wanted to create a smart bike, and I built it to its entirety. But unfortunately the Nano was too weak to run and store the massive sketch that was needed. So I decided to revisit one of my previous projects, a NeoPixel matrix that ran a Pong game. I wanted to make it portable instead, and a 1.7" OLED would make a perfect display.

 

 

 

Video

Designing the Game

 

For this Pong game I wanted to keep it relatively simple, which meant no computer controlled paddle or fancy ball reflection algorithms. Basically, there is a single paddle that a user can move up or down, and making the ball collide with the paddle would cause its x axis vector to flip. Each time the ball gets hit there is a sound that plays.

 

 

When the game device is powered on, a screen comes up with the game title and instructions. Additionally, my mother created a small theme song that loops in the background until the top button is pressed.

 

 

 

 

Designing the Gaming Device

 

My go-to CAD program is Fusion 360, so I decided to use it to design my pong gaming device. I began by designing each component used: an OLED, Arduino Nano, and a speaker.

 

 

This way I can see exactly where and how each component should fit inside of the enclosure. I then put the Nano and PCB in the back part of the case, and the OLED on top of it.

 

 

Next was the question of where to put the speaker and buttons. I decided that the 3W speaker could go just below the screen (looking at it from the top), and that also required putting a "grill" over the speaker so the sound wouldn't be muffled.

 

 

Lastly, I added two buttons on the left side to add controls.

 

 

 

 

 

Constructing the Device

 

I began by 3D printing each part, consisting of the lower half, the upper half, and 2 buttons.

 

 

 

 

 

Next I soldered a female header to the 4x6cm and wired it to the Nano. This not only allows for the OLED to be easily removed, but it also elevates it above the Arduino Nano. Check the schematic for wiring information.

 

 

 

 

 

Then I wired up the two buttons, along with a simple micro USB breakout board for power. The speaker was also attached and placed it its correct position.

 

 

My Fusion 360 design allows for 3mm machine screws to hold down the OLED, speaker, and connect the two halves of the device. But, I had to make them exact, so I used my drill press to bore out 8 holes: 2 for the speaker, 2 for the screen, and 4 underneath.

 

 

 

 

Programming the Game

 

The use of a simple interface was vital to keeping the program small. I started by adding several libraries: Adafruit_GFX, Adafruit_SSD1351, and the Arduino Timer library. Next I defined my pins and colors, such as the OLED's pins and 16 bit color definitions. In my code there are also 4 ways to change how the game plays, such as changing the paddle dimensions and how quickly the ball moves. A section then exists where each variable is defined, including the score and various coordinates. Whenever the device is powered on an image of a ball and some text appears on the screen, along with a little theme song which is defined earlier in the code. Once the game starts two timers are created, one that updates the paddle, and the other updates the ball. Each time the ball's position updates its coordinates are checked to make sure it doesn't go past the screen border or if it's touching a paddle. Each time it bounces either its x or y axis is inverted and a small tone plays. Watch the video at the beginning of this writeup to see how the game plays.

 

 

 

Playing Pong!

 

The name of the game is to get the lowest score possible. There is no time limit, so it is very enjoyable and even trance-inducing. All that is necessary is pushing one of two buttons to move the paddle up or down. It is also possible to add a way to store the highest score using the Arduino's EEPROM.

 

 

Schematics

 

Code

 

Pong Code

C/C++

CODE
//Button Pins and Speaker Pin
#define UP 17 //A3
#define DOWN 16 //A2
#define TONE_PIN A1

//OLED Pins: CLK=13 and MOSI=11
#define dc 4
#define cs 7
#define rst 10

//Color definitions
#define	BLACK           0x0000
#define	BLUE            0x001F
#define	RED             0xF800
#define	GREEN           0x07E0
#define CYAN            0x07FF
#define MAGENTA         0xF81F
#define YELLOW          0xFFE0  
#define WHITE           0xFFFF

#include <Adafruit_GFX.h>
#include <Adafruit_SSD1351.h>
#include <SPI.h>
#include "Timer.h"
#include "pitches.h"

#define PADDLE_HEIGHT 12
#define PADDLE_WIDTH 3
#define BALL_DELAY 40 //How quickly the ball's position updates, smaller number = more difficult to play
#define PADDLE_DELAY 5



Adafruit_SSD1351 tft = Adafruit_SSD1351(cs, dc, rst);
Timer t;

bool game_running = false;
int score=0;
int ballDIR[2] = {1,1};
int ballCoords[2] = {58,58};
int oldBallCoords[2];
int currentY = (128-PADDLE_HEIGHT) / 2;
int oldY;

#define NOTE_NUMBER 11

int melody[]={
    NOTE_CS5, NOTE_GS4, NOTE_AS4, NOTE_C5, NOTE_AS4, NOTE_GS4, NOTE_CS5, NOTE_GS4, NOTE_AS4, NOTE_GS4, NOTE_CS5
};

int noteDurations[]={
    4, 8, 8,8,16,16,16,8,8,8,8
};

void startGame();

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  // put your setup code here, to run once:
    initPins();
    tft.begin();
    initScreen();
}

void loop() {
  // put your main code here, to run repeatedly:
    if(game_running){
        t.update();
    }
}

void initPins(){
    pinMode(TONE_PIN,OUTPUT);
    pinMode(UP, INPUT_PULLUP);
    pinMode(DOWN, INPUT_PULLUP);
}

void playTheme(){
    for(int thisNote=0;thisNote<NOTE_NUMBER;thisNote++){
        if(digitalRead(UP)==0){
          game_running=true;
        }
        if(game_running){
            break;
        }
        int noteDuration = 1000 / (noteDurations[thisNote]/2);
        tone(TONE_PIN, melody[thisNote], noteDuration);
        int pauseBetweenNotes = noteDuration * 1.3;
        delay(pauseBetweenNotes);
        noTone(TONE_PIN);
    }
}

void updatePaddle();
void updateBall();

void initScreen(){
    tft.fillScreen(BLACK);
    tft.setCursor(0,0);
    tft.setTextSize(3);
    tft.print("  PONG");
    tft.fillCircle(59,59,20,WHITE);
    tft.setTextSize(1);
    tft.setCursor(0, 100);
    tft.print("Start game by pressing the upper button");
    while(!game_running){
        playTheme();
    }
    noTone(TONE_PIN);
    detachInterrupt(UP);
    tft.fillScreen(BLACK);
    t.every(BALL_DELAY, updateBall);
    t.every(PADDLE_DELAY, updatePaddle);
}
    

void startGame(){
    Serial.println("Pressed");
    game_running = true;
}

void updateBall(){
    oldBallCoords[0] = ballCoords[0];
    oldBallCoords[1] = ballCoords[1];
    if(ballCoords[0]>=127){
        ballDIR[0] = -ballDIR[0];
        tone(TONE_PIN, NOTE_C4, 50);
        delay(50*1.3);
        noTone(TONE_PIN);
    }
    else if(ballCoords[0]<=0){ //You lose
        score ++;
        tft.setCursor(20, 50);
        tft.setTextSize(3);
        tft.print(score);
        delay(3000);
        tft.fillScreen(BLACK);
        ballCoords[0] = 58;
        ballCoords[1] = 58;
    }
    
    if(ballCoords[1]>= 127||ballCoords[1]<=0){
        ballDIR[1] = -ballDIR[1];
        tone(TONE_PIN, NOTE_C4, 50);
            delay(50*1.3);
            noTone(TONE_PIN);
    }
    if(ballCoords[0]>=1&&ballCoords[0]<=PADDLE_WIDTH+1){
        if(ballCoords[0]>=currentY&&ballCoords[0]<=currentY+(PADDLE_HEIGHT/2)){
            ballDIR[0] = -ballDIR[0];
            tone(TONE_PIN, NOTE_C4, 50);
            delay(50*1.3);
            noTone(TONE_PIN);
        }
        else if(ballCoords[0]>=currentY+6&&ballCoords[0]<=currentY+PADDLE_HEIGHT){
            ballDIR[0] = -ballDIR[0];
            ballDIR[1] = -ballDIR[1];
            tone(TONE_PIN, NOTE_C4, 50);
            delay(50*1.3);
            noTone(TONE_PIN);
        }
    }
    ballCoords[0]+=ballDIR[0];
    ballCoords[1] += ballDIR[1];
    tft.fillRect(oldBallCoords[0],oldBallCoords[1],3,3,BLACK);
    tft.fillRect(ballCoords[0],ballCoords[1],3,3,WHITE);
}

void updatePaddle(){
    oldY = currentY;
    if(digitalRead(UP)==0){
        if(currentY > 0){
            currentY-=1;
        }
    }
    else if(digitalRead(DOWN)==0){
        if(currentY<127-PADDLE_HEIGHT){
        currentY +=1;
        }
    }
    tft.fillRect(1, oldY, PADDLE_WIDTH, PADDLE_HEIGHT, BLACK);
    tft.fillRect(1, currentY, PADDLE_WIDTH, PADDLE_HEIGHT, WHITE);
}

pitches.h

C/C++

CODE
/*************************************************
 * Public Constants
 *************************************************/

#define NOTE_B0  31
#define NOTE_C1  33
#define NOTE_CS1 35
#define NOTE_D1  37
#define NOTE_DS1 39
#define NOTE_E1  41
#define NOTE_F1  44
#define NOTE_FS1 46
#define NOTE_G1  49
#define NOTE_GS1 52
#define NOTE_A1  55
#define NOTE_AS1 58
#define NOTE_B1  62
#define NOTE_C2  65
#define NOTE_CS2 69
#define NOTE_D2  73
#define NOTE_DS2 78
#define NOTE_E2  82
#define NOTE_F2  87
#define NOTE_FS2 93
#define NOTE_G2  98
#define NOTE_GS2 104
#define NOTE_A2  110
#define NOTE_AS2 117
#define NOTE_B2  123
#define NOTE_C3  131
#define NOTE_CS3 139
#define NOTE_D3  147
#define NOTE_DS3 156
#define NOTE_E3  165
#define NOTE_F3  175
#define NOTE_FS3 185
#define NOTE_G3  196
#define NOTE_GS3 208
#define NOTE_A3  220
#define NOTE_AS3 233
#define NOTE_B3  247
#define NOTE_C4  262
#define NOTE_CS4 277
#define NOTE_D4  294
#define NOTE_DS4 311
#define NOTE_E4  330
#define NOTE_F4  349
#define NOTE_FS4 370
#define NOTE_G4  392
#define NOTE_GS4 415
#define NOTE_A4  440
#define NOTE_AS4 466
#define NOTE_B4  494
#define NOTE_C5  523
#define NOTE_CS5 554
#define NOTE_D5  587
#define NOTE_DS5 622
#define NOTE_E5  659
#define NOTE_F5  698
#define NOTE_FS5 740
#define NOTE_G5  784
#define NOTE_GS5 831
#define NOTE_A5  880
#define NOTE_AS5 932
#define NOTE_B5  988
#define NOTE_C6  1047
#define NOTE_CS6 1109
#define NOTE_D6  1175
#define NOTE_DS6 1245
#define NOTE_E6  1319
#define NOTE_F6  1397
#define NOTE_FS6 1480
#define NOTE_G6  1568
#define NOTE_GS6 1661
#define NOTE_A6  1760
#define NOTE_AS6 1865
#define NOTE_B6  1976
#define NOTE_C7  2093
#define NOTE_CS7 2217
#define NOTE_D7  2349
#define NOTE_DS7 2489
#define NOTE_E7  2637
#define NOTE_F7  2794
#define NOTE_FS7 2960
#define NOTE_G7  3136
#define NOTE_GS7 3322
#define NOTE_A7  3520
#define NOTE_AS7 3729
#define NOTE_B7  3951
#define NOTE_C8  4186
#define NOTE_CS8 4435
#define NOTE_D8  4699
#define NOTE_DS8 4978

The article was first published in hackster, December 11,  2017

cr: https://www.hackster.io/gatoninja236/handheld-arduino-pong-console-ae1c54

author: Arduino “having11” Guy

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